unitive

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This is the message we have heard from him and declare to you: God is light; in him there is no darkness at all. || 1 John 1:5

Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love. || 1 John 4:8

This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters. || 1 John 3:16

Oh God, Thou art lightning and love. || Gerard Manley Hopkins

(Source: theunitive.com)


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Tom Petty may have said it best, “the waiting is the hardest part.” And while it may not be the hardest, it certainly is not easy. We do not like waiting. Yet it is part of every day  life.
Most of us are experienced in waiting
… for your ride to come
..for your hair to dry
…for your grades to post
…for your movie to download
…for your career to start
…for God to speak. (read more) View Larger

Tom Petty may have said it best, “the waiting is the hardest part.” And while it may not be the hardest, it certainly is not easy. We do not like waiting. Yet it is part of every day  life.

Most of us are experienced in waiting

… for your ride to come

..for your hair to dry

…for your grades to post

…for your movie to download

…for your career to start

…for God to speak. (read more)


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When Martin Luther King Jr., confronted racism in the white church in the South, he did not call on Southern churches to become more secular. Read his sermons and “Letter from Birmingham Jail” and see how he argued. He invoked God’s moral law and the Scripture. He called white Christians to be more true to their own beliefs and to realize what the Bible really teaches. He did not say “Truth is relative and everyone is free to determine what is right or wrong for them.” If everything is relative, there would have been no incentive for white people in the South to give up their power. Rather, Dr. King invoked the prophet Amos, who said, “Let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness as a mighty stream” (Amos 5:24). The greatest champion of justice in our era knew that antidote to racism was not less Christianity, but a deeper and truer Christianity. (Tim Keller, Reason for God)
(Read more) View Larger

When Martin Luther King Jr., confronted racism in the white church in the South, he did not call on Southern churches to become more secular. Read his sermons and “Letter from Birmingham Jail” and see how he argued. He invoked God’s moral law and the Scripture. He called white Christians to be more true to their own beliefs and to realize what the Bible really teaches. He did not say “Truth is relative and everyone is free to determine what is right or wrong for them.” If everything is relative, there would have been no incentive for white people in the South to give up their power. Rather, Dr. King invoked the prophet Amos, who said, “Let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness as a mighty stream” (Amos 5:24). The greatest champion of justice in our era knew that antidote to racism was not less Christianity, but a deeper and truer Christianity. (Tim Keller, Reason for God)

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I have a hard time resting. It’s difficult for me to not touch my phone for extended periods of time—it’s something I’m working on.
If I peered behind this compulsion, into my motivations, I’d see lots of things: a desire to be helpful, a need for approval and a fear of letting people down, just to name a few.
So here’s where Jesus continues to help me.

And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed. And Simon and those who were with him searched for him, and they found him and said to him, “Everyone is looking for you.” (Mark 1:35-37)

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I have a hard time resting. It’s difficult for me to not touch my phone for extended periods of time—it’s something I’m working on.

If I peered behind this compulsion, into my motivations, I’d see lots of things: a desire to be helpful, a need for approval and a fear of letting people down, just to name a few.

So here’s where Jesus continues to help me.

And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed. And Simon and those who were with him searched for him, and they found him and said to him, “Everyone is looking for you.” (Mark 1:35-37)

(read more)


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Once, when perusing blogs, I saw someone had posted a video of people sharing the things they most regretted in life. I clicked on the video, curious to discover just what it is your average person might regret most. But I was disappointed. Because do you know what people regret? Nothing. The most common response was, “I don’t have any regrets.”

First I thought, “What a boring video.” I wanted to hear people say, “I should have stayed with Estelle.” or “I never should have trusted that bloke who said the Oakleys were real.”

Then I thought, “Really? No regrets? Is that possible?” (Read more) View Larger

Once, when perusing blogs, I saw someone had posted a video of people sharing the things they most regretted in life. I clicked on the video, curious to discover just what it is your average person might regret most. But I was disappointed. Because do you know what people regret? Nothing. The most common response was, “I don’t have any regrets.”

First I thought, “What a boring video.” I wanted to hear people say, “I should have stayed with Estelle.” or “I never should have trusted that bloke who said the Oakleys were real.”

Then I thought, “Really? No regrets? Is that possible?” (Read more)


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I’ve believed in God for most of my life. Even as a teenager, when I claimed to be an atheist, I still couldn’t escape God. He showed up in the occasional prayer. He showed up in moments of ironic frustration, when I would wonder “How could God allow ______ ?”
Eventually I dropped the atheist act and began to cautiously acknowledge that God existed–but it still wasn’t personal. My faith, then, was something like an earthquake in far-away country; I believed it was real but it felt distant–it was hard to feel it’s power.
Go to original article. View Larger

I’ve believed in God for most of my life. Even as a teenager, when I claimed to be an atheist, I still couldn’t escape God. He showed up in the occasional prayer. He showed up in moments of ironic frustration, when I would wonder “How could God allow ______ ?”

Eventually I dropped the atheist act and began to cautiously acknowledge that God existed–but it still wasn’t personal. My faith, then, was something like an earthquake in far-away country; I believed it was real but it felt distant–it was hard to feel it’s power.

Go to original article.


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